Cuteness overload

Hi there, how are your sewing plans?  Mine are all haywire. My to do list at the moment is

  • make more trousers, I’ve, err, cut them out. And nothing else. Oh, I managed stay stitching a week after cutting them out. But come to think of it I don’t think I’ve cut all the waistband pieces out. Sigh.
  • Make The Man another waistcoat for our wedding anniversary this weekend. Not started yet. Hmm, maybe for his birthday in March then. In my defence, he’s been around a lot convalescing.
  • Make a thing for The Girls birthday on Friday. For which the fabric I ordered hasn’t arrived yet so I’ve managed to … tape together the pdf and buy some buttons. Good job somebody else I know is making her something then (more on that later).

So, what have I been doing then? Mainly making sunhats like a mad thing. For no particularly good reason as they’re not exactly needed in Feb in the UK. But they are off my pile, so some brownie points there. Well, most of them were. Todays wasn’t. It was comissioned. Wanna see?

time tiny sunhat

teeny tiny sunhat

This is another oliver and s sunhat, in a size smaller than the smallest pattern size, acheived by printing it at the wrong scale (gasp) and then overlaying it with the pattern printed at the right scale to estimate what size it’ll be. This is meant to be 0-3 months.

obligatory inside view

obligatory inside view

My friend asked me to make a sunhat as she’s just become a grandmother for the first time and wants to take one with her when she goes over to Australia to visit her granddaughter. Except that you can’t buy them in the UK at this time of year. Her fabric guidance (over the phone, we live no where near each other) was “nothing pink and girly, something light coloured, it’s hot there”. So I dug out the leftovers from a top I made last year. It’s a kind of wrinkly cotton. Light coloured – tick, not pink and girly – tick. I’m slightly worried that the dots are too large a scale for such a small thing, but I think they’re ok.

check out the french seams

check out the french seams

I decided not to make it reversible and just do a lining for the brim. I figured that would make it cooler for the baby. But I wanted smooth seam finishes for a little head, so I french seamed the insides. Now, I don’t know if you’ve made this sunhat, but a quick internet search will confirm that attaching the crown to the sides can cause the air to turn blue, its a common phenomenon. I’ve made a lot of these hats in the past and I know the smaller the hat the harder it is. So, why I chose to french seam this on a very small hat, I don’t know. But somehow it worked. Yay me! I sewed the brim lining around to the main brim around the outside then slip stiched it in place by hand. Yes, me, handsewing. On the train (2 hour round trip to collect some lost property today, it filled the time).

kimono

kimono

I had more of the fabric left than I thought, just a narrow band of it, but enough to also squeeze out a purl bee kimono inspired by tea and rainbows.

ugh, yucky button holes

ugh, yucky button holes

This was fairly straightforward make, I’m not sure how practical it’ll be (it may well not even fit by the time it arrives), but it’s cute. The seam allowances were a bit random, an 3/4″ on the shoulder seam so you can french seam it without trimming (never come across that before) and then 1/4″ on the side seams.

see, really yucky

see, really yucky

You’re supposed to sew to poppers (snaps) on to fasten it. I decided to try button instead but didn’t stabilise the fabric at all, just tried a machine button hole on a single layer of cotton and the results were Not Pretty at All.

and gnarly, did I mention gnarly?

and gnarly, did I mention gnarly?

They took a lot of unpicking.

very cute button

very cute button

Then I changed the other side to be my top front to hide the mangled fabric where the buttonholes had been (which still looked a bit stressed after lots of steaming) and sewed a popper on with a cute button on the top. The button I bought when in Birmingham, it’s the same make to the ones on the heart cardigan and I have 6 left in my stash now.

inside the kimono

inside the kimono

I couldn’t find turquoise bias binding, I ended up using navy satin binding (I have given up making my own). I’m a bit disappointed with the colour but it’s ok. In real life it’s more noticeably darker and a different shade to the turquoise spots than the photo’s show.

grr, scruffy finish

grr, scruffy finish

Mainly I wish I’d ignored the instructions and applied the sleeve end binding after sewing the side seams, not before. It’d be fiddly, but neater. This is my least favourite bit of the garment.

hmm, they ain't never going to fit at the same time

hmm, they ain’t never going to fit at the same time

But overall, I’m pretty happy. They both look cute, but then things that scale usually do. Now to hope that my friend, her daughter and her granddaughter all like them too. Fingers crossed.

How about you, do you manage to stick to plans, or do you too get distracted?

9 thoughts on “Cuteness overload

  1. Distracted? Um…I haven’t started calling myself Crystal the Unassembled for nothing! I have to commend you on such a cute set! Both concepts of commissioned work and tiny garments scare me to death. I’m also appreciating the slang I’m learning here. We don’t say “turn the air blue” here, so I Googled it. I look forward to discovering more English idioms in future posts! LOL

    • I’m sure you’re far too dignified to turn the air blue 😉 Commissioned is a grand term, she’s my best mate. And tiny is at least fast and good for using up those bits that are too big to throw away but not big enough to do anything with. It’s that or quilting, which I haven’t the patience for.

  2. These are so cute! Small is very fiddly, so extra marks for them looking so good.

  3. Oh my goodness! Cuteness overload indeed! You are so talented! I don’t think I could sew an adult sized version of these garments let alone these teeny tiny ones!

  4. Pingback: Prolific Project Starter | Pink Trouser details

  5. Pingback: Prolific Project Starter | Hoxton Bonnets

  6. Pingback: Prolific Project Starter | And all the heads they shall be covered up.

  7. Pingback: Grown up stash busting | Prolific Project Starter

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s